Shinjinbukan.com - The international portal of the Shinjinbukan Foundation

 

 

Home > Learning Resources > Ryūkyū Martial Arts / Dictionary: "K"

 

武道辞典

Budō Jiten − Martial Arts Dictionary

This dictionary is the result of my personal research to develop a martial arts vocabulary based on the living traditions of Ti, as taught by my teacher Onaga Yoshimitsu Kaichō at the Shinjinbukan School. Unauthorized reproduction, translation into other languages or sale of these materials constitutes a copyright violation.

Written by Jimmy Mora

Search Alphabetically:


Search by Topic:

   

   

かがみ

kagami 

Glossary Category:  Shinjinbukan/System

Lit. Mirror.  In the Shinjibukan school the use of mirrors is extremely important for practicing kata, movement, and techniques.

かい

kai 

Glossary Category:  Budō/General Terms

Lit. Association.  In the case of all Martial Arts, the words association or organization are written with the word kai.  For example, the Shinjinbukan association is called Kokusai Shinjinbukan Karate Dō Kyōkai.

会長

かいちょう

Kaichō  (alt. kaichou, kaicho, kaichoo)

Glossary Category:  Budō/Ranks & Titles , Shinjinbukan/Syllabus

Lit. President or chairman.  The title Kaichō is given to the president or chairman of a martial arts association or federation.  For example, the current President of the Shinjinbukan International Association is Onaga Yoshimitsu Kaichō. 
See Kanchō

会社

かいしゃ

kaisha

Glossary Category:  Nihongo/Culture

Lit. Company, corporation.  All Japanese companies are also referred to as kaisha. 

かかと

kakato 

Glossary Category:  Okinawa Karate Dō/Anatomy

Lit. Heel of Foot. 

カキヂ      (カキ手)

kaki di

Glossary Category:  Shinjinbukan/System

Uchināguchi (Okinawan Dialect) Lit. Hooking Hand.  Kaki Di is a typical Okinawa Ti technique executed with palms facing forward by using a circular hand motion that ends with the outer wrist hooking into the opponent's arm.  The size and shape of the circular hand motion vary depending on the distance from the opponent’s arm and the technique that follows the Kaki Di.  It is typically followed by a grip and a Keri from Neko Ashi; or it could be followed by tenshin combined with a tsuki to the ribs.  One of the classic examples of Kaki Di appears in the opening move of Dai Ichi Kihon Gata, as well as in the opening move of Neko Ashi Tenshin (Kihon Gata).
See Ti (ティー) , Dai Ichi Kihon Gata , Kaki Di (photos)

カキエ      (鉤)

Kakie

Glossary Category:  Shinjinbukan/Syllabus

Uchināguchi (Okinawan Dialect) Lit. To Hook.  An ancient Ti tradition used to train with a partner.  It utilizes circular hand motions and while maintaining arm contact, the wrist hooks into the opponent.  Therefore, by learning to feel the opponent’s arm movement and by using pushing or pulling, an endless number of close combat techniques and counter techniques are possible.  In the Shinjinbukan school, Kakie is always practiced from the jigotai stance, while keeping the waki closed (side of the body below the armpit).  There are three general categories of Kakie: Hichi Gaki, Ushi Gaki & Hani Gaki.

Unfortunately, there are many misconceptions about Kakie among martial artists:

Misconception #1: Kakie is a simple exercise for timing and body conditioning.
When done correctly, Kakie is one of Ti’s training methods used to develop close combat techniques.  Indeed, there are some basic drills, but beyond this introductory level, there is complex hand footwork that is far from basic.

Misconception #2: Kakie is a variation of Chinese push hands or sticky hand techniques.
From the outside they might look the same, but there are major differences.  Kakie was designed as a method to learn Ti.  Therefore, it must use Ti’s unique body mechanics, stances, body posture and movement, which are unique to Okinawan Martial Arts.

Misconception #3: Kakie is only practiced in Gōjū Ryū and not in Shōrin Ryū styles.
Kakie has been part of the Okinawa Ti training tradition for centuries.  Therefore, Kakie is not exclusive to any specific style.  Most Karate schools that claim Kakie as part of their style do not integrate these body mechanics with the rest of their Karate.

Misconception #4: Kakie is a unique form of kumite.
Some schools use the word “kakie” to name a type of jiyū kumite used in competition.  In fact, this is not kakie!!  This is just sparring with some specific rules.
See In , , shokusokugi , Iri Kumi , kirikae

構え

かまえ

kamae 

Glossary by Category:  Okinawa Karate Dō/Commands

Lit. Posture, pose or style.  The arm and hand positions used for specific fighting techniques.  They are also called ready position or on guard position.  Traditionally these positions appear as opening moves in ancient kata.

かみ

Kami 

Glossary Category:  Shinjinbukan/Philosophy

Lit. God, gods, spirit, mind, soul.  The name Shin-jin-bu-kan is made up of four kanji, or Chinese characters, out of which the first character could be pronounced "kami" or "shin".  Furthermore, the opening statement of the Shinjinbukan precepts, or Dōjō Kun, reads: "Kami no Michi", which could be translated as "the Path of God", "Spiritual Path" or "Godly Path".

館長

かんちょう

Kanchō  (alt. kanchou, kancho, kanchoo)

Glossary Category:  Budō/Ranks & Titles , Shinjinbukan/Syllabus

Lit. Director, curator, superintendantThe title Kanchō is given to the master or head instructor of a martial art school.  When the Shinjinbukan School was founded in Okinawa, the title Kanchō applied to Onaga Yoshimitsu, as its founder and first Head Instructor.  Hence the Shinjinbukan Dōjō Kun (School's precepts) was written and signed as such.  However, this title has now been passed down to his daughter Onaga Michiko Kanchō.
See Kaichō

   

Search Alphabetically or By Topic            Dictionary Format            Bibliography            Rōmaji — Japanese with roman letters            Back To Top

   

漢字

かんじ

kanji

Glossary Category:  Nihongo/Basics

Lit. Han symbols or Chinese characters.  The Japanese language has approximately 5,000 Chinese symbols, out of which 2,000 are commonly used, and close to 1,000 are learned in grade school.  The word Kanji, pronounced Hanzi in Chinese (Pinyin spelling), refers to symbols that originated during the Han Dynasty, which ruled China from 206BC to AD220.  And by the Chinese Golden Age, Tang (AD618-906) and Song (AD960-1279) Dynasties, the Chinese written language became the predominant one throughout East Asia.  Hence, the written language of this period is known today as Classical Chinese, as it was used in literature, government official records, and religious texts through China, Japan, Korea, Okinawa, and other parts of southeast Asia.  For example, all early historical records of the Ryūkyū Kingdom in Okinawa were written in Classical Chinese.
The use of Chinese characters has always been in constant evolution.  Throughout Asia, the meaning remains the same, but there are many pronunciations.  For example, the same character has a different pronunciation between Chinese and Japanese and among Chinese dialects: Mandarin and Cantonese.  Even in Korea, where a separate written language was developed in modern times, Chinese symbols have a Korean pronunciation.  Nowadays, in mainland China there is trend to create simplified versions of characters.  However, in Taiwan and Japan this trend is not as widely spread.

かお

kao 

Glossary Category:  Okinawa Karate Dō/Anatomy

Lit. Face or expression. 

体を分ける方法   

からだをわけるのほうほう

karada wo wakeru hōhō

Glossary Category:  Shinjinbukan/System

A method or process to divide or partition the body. The concept of dividing the body into sections by using different Kamae (Guarding Postures).  Each Kamae divides the body into sections of different proportions.  At the same time, each Kamae also creates an opening that invites the opponent's attack.  These openings are based on the concepts of In and Yō.  By following this approach we remain in control and able to lead any counter attack against our opponents. 
See kamae , In , , shokusokugi , Iri Kumi

空手

からて

Karate

Glossary Category:  Okinawa Karate Dō/Ryūha

Lit. Empty hand.  Karate is a Martial Art, which originated in Okinawa, Japan, hundreds of years ago and then spread to mainland Japan and the rest of the world.  Nowadays, there are many types of Karate: Okinawan Karate, Japanese Karate, Korean Karate, Olympic sports Karate, free-style Karate, etc…
See Karate Dō , Okinawa Karate Dō , ryūha

空手道

からてどう

Karate Dō  (alt. Karate Dou, Karate Doo)

Glossary Category:  Okinawa Karate Dō/Ryūha

Lit. The way of the Empty hand.  The name Karate Dō is a more formal and appropriate way to describe this martial art, rather than just using word karate by itself.  This helps emphasize that path or the way of Karate.
See Karate , Okinawa Karate Dō , ryūha

空手家

からてか

Karateka

Glossary Category:  Budō/Ranks & Titles , Okinawa Karate Dō/Masters

Lit. The Karate practitioner.  The title Karateka is reserved to martial artists devoted to the practice, study, teaching and constant improvement of their own Karate Dō.  This title is reserved to Master instructors with many years of experience, who have already achieved busai, the maturity of their martial art age, and who have embodied a lifestyle around Karate.  Even someone who has been training very hard for two, three, or five years should only be described as a Karate student, and not as a Karateka
See busai

かた

kata (1) 

Glossary Category:  Okinawa Karate Dō/Kata , Shinjinbukan/Syllabus

Lit. Mould, type, model, style, shape, data-type.  A sequence of moves and fighting techniques arranged in a specific order. The concept of creating kata originated in China.  Some kata are hundreds of years old and are part of the Martial Arts living tradition.  In modern times, many new kata were created by each style.  At the same time, ancient kata were renamed and/or recreated.  Today many consider kata as simple exercises designed to provide physical and mental strength.  However, in the Shinjinbukan School, Onaga Sensei defines kata as the shape or the outer physical form of Karate, and he emphasizes that kata are not Karate itself.

Onaga Sensei also teaches the analogy between Kata and Kanji (or Chinese symbols), which represent a meaning.  First, you must learn the stroke orders of each symbol in order to write a well executed letter.  If the stroke order or the shape of the Kanji were not accurate, the letter would not be legible.  A Kata could be understood as a collection of Kanji or symbols, representing a message, a letter from ancient teachers.  Like the Kanji, if the form or shape of the kata is incorrect, the meaning will be lost.

かた

kata (2) 

Glossary Category:  Okinawa Karate Dō/Anatomy

Lit. Shoulder. 

稽古

けいこ

keiko 

Glossary Category:  Budō/General Terms

Lit. Training, practice or study. 

稽古着

けいこぎ

keiko gi

Glossary Category:  Budō/General Terms

Lit. Martial arts uniform.  The proper name of the Karate uniform.  In ancient times, no uniform was used during training.

   

Search Alphabetically or By Topic            Dictionary Format            Bibliography            Rōmaji — Japanese with roman letters            Back To Top

   

稽古着の着方

けいこぎのきかた

keiko gi no kikata

Glossary Category:  Budō/General Terms

Lit. Uniform wearing etiquette.  Martial arts have specific rules on how to wear their uniforms.

稽古法

けいこほう

keikohō

Glossary Category:  Okinawa Karate Dō/Techniques , Shinjinbukan/System

Lit. Training method.  The specific training method used by each style of Martial Art.  The Shinjinbukan School’s curriculum, or keikohō, is based on all Ti principles taught by Onaga Yoshimitsu Kaichō.
See dontohō , hōhō

剣道

けんどう

kendō  (alt. kendo, kendou)

Glossary Category:  Budō/General Terms

Lit. The Way of The Sword. Kendō is a modern Japanese martial art based on kenjutsu (the traditional Japanese swordsmanship).  However, Kendō is practiced with a shinai, which is a sword made up of four bamboo slats which are held together by leather or carbon fiber fittings.  The shinai is meant to represent a Katana (a Japanese sword).  In addition, a protective armor is used for competitions.  Kendō practicioners are able to sparr with relative safety allowing them to incorporate elements of sports and more traditional strong martial arts.  A Kendō practitioner is referred to as a Kendōka .
See

喧嘩

けんか

kenka

Glossary Category:  Nihongo/Miscellaneous

Lit. Quarrel or brawl, failure. 

蹴り

けり

keri

Glossary Category:  Okinawa Karate Dō/Techniques , Shinjinbukan/Syllabus

Lit. Foot strike.  A keri, or foot strike, should not to be confused with a kick.  There are two forms of keri in traditional Okinawan Karate: mae geri (frontal foot stike) and yoko geri (lateral foot strike).  Mawashi geri (roundhouse kick) is considered a sports technique that is not part of the Okinawan martial arts tradition.  However, in Okinawan Karate there are some knees strike techniques that could be simplified for sports karate and turned into mawashi geri. 
See keru , tenshin , tsuki, tsuki, keri, tenshin

蹴る

ける

keru

Glossary Category:  Shinjinbukan/System

Lit. Foot strike.  This is the foot striking technique used in Ti, which is different to a regular keri. 
See keri , tenshin , tsuki, keri, tenshin

気を付け

きをつけ

ki o tsuke  (alt. ki wo tsuke)

Glossary Category:  Okinawa Karate Dō/Commands

Lit. Posture, pose or style. This command is used during drills to bring the student to ready position or "position of attention".  It could be executed at two different stances: musubi dachi or heisoku dachi.  In most Karate styles, the arms are placed at the side of the legs, like a soldier.  However, in the old Okinawan schools the arms will hang naturally at the center axis of body, covering the groin.  It is generally followed by one of these commands: rei (bow), yoi (ready), kamae (on guard), hajime (begin execution), or naore (relax or end). 

気を付けって

きをつけって

ki o tsukette  (alt. ki wo tsukette)

Glossary Category:  Nihongo/Miscellaneous

Lit. Be careful, take care. 

気合       气合

きあい

kiai 

Glossary Category:  Okinawa Karate Dō/Commands , Shinjinbukan/System

Lit. Scream, yell, fighting spirit.  It refers to the shouts used by most Karate schools today.  Most martial artists don’t have a clear understanding of why they use kiai (yelling).  Its use originated from Kendo (Japanese fencing) and other military training and was later incorporated into Karate at the beginning of the 20th century.  Hence, it is not part of Ti, nor an authentic Okinawan martial arts tradition.  In the Shinjinbukan School we neither use Kiai, nor unnatural sounds, nor distorted face expressions, nor exaggerated breathing during any technique.  On rare occasions, Shinjinbukan junior members are allowed to use kiai during a kata demonstration.  Another exception could be to use kiai to demonstrate the proper breathing techniques, timing and duration of exhalation and inhalation.  However, all external sounds are dropped all together as soon as the proper breathing is understood by the student. 

基本

きほん

kihon 

Glossary Category:  Budō/General Terms , Okinawa Karate Dō/Techniques , Shinjinbukan/Syllabus

Lit. Foundation, basis, standard.  The foundation, the basics, the building blocks of a Martial Arts systems.  In the Shinjinbukan School, all kihon drills are constantly practiced and are focused on the three basic elements of the System: Tsuki (hand strike), Keri (foot strike), Tenshin (changing direction or movement) . 

基本型

きほんがた

kihon gata  (alt. kihongata)

Glossary Category:  Budō/General Terms , Okinawa Karate Dō/Kata , Shinjinbukan/Syllabus

Lit. Basic form.  The word Gata is a phonetic variation used to soften and to connect the word Kihon and Kata.  In Japanese, it sounds better to say Kihon Gata, rather than Kihon Kata. 

A Kihon Gata is a Basic Kata or Basic Form used to teach the foundations of a Karate style.  It follows a flexible structure with improvisational quality, which contrast the set structure of a normal Kata (Form) made up of many complex moves.  A Kihon Gata is made up of multiple parts or sections that could be added or omitted as needed.  Each section contains a simple combination of techniques moving forward and another simple combination of techniques retreating back. 

The two patterns, moving forward and retreating, are repeated as many times as desired by the teacher, senpai or individual practitioner.  During demonstrations (enbu) or testings, the entire Kihon Gata should be performed as one entity connecting from one section to the next and from one combination to the next.
See kata (1) , Dai Ichi Kihon Gata , Dai Ni Kihon Gata , Neko Ashi Tenshin (2)

   

Search Alphabetically or By Topic            Dictionary Format            Bibliography            Rōmaji — Japanese with roman letters            Back To Top

   

奇麗

きれい

kirei  (alt. kihongata)

Glossary Category:  Shinjinbukan/System

Lit. Beautiful, pretty, clean.  Kirei is the second stage of the learning process used by the Shinjinbukan School.  Based on this principle, every new process MUST be learned with beauty of movement, while maintaining the other principles of the learning processs.  If the body goes stiff the beauty of movement can not be developed.  The Kirei quality is essential to all body movements: basic techniques, body displacement, kata, machiwara training, etc.
See yukkuri , seikaku , hayaku , yukkuri, kirei, seikaku, hayaku

切り替え

きりかえ

kirikae 

Glossary Category:  Shinjinbukan/System

Lit. Exchange, conversion, replacement, to switch.  Kirikai is the method used to change hands or switch sides upon contact with an opponent.  In the Shinjinbukan School, kirikae drills are used to develop the understanding of In and .  Therefore, it could be considered a method for understanding and learning the applications of Iri Kumi
See In , , shokusokugi , Iri Kumi , Kakie

鍛え方

きたえがた

kitae gata

Glossary Category:  Okinawa Karate Dō/Techniques , Shinjinbukan/Syllabus

Lit. Conditioning Method.  This is a general term used to describe many different types of conditioning drills to develop resistance towards receiving a strike.  There is a wide range of Kitae Gata exercises used in many Martial Arts.  There are conditioning exercises for the arms, legs, chest, abdomen, etc.  Unfortunately, many martial artists misunderstand these conditioning drills to the point of engaging in extremely brutal sessions with their training partners. 

The proper Kitae Gata training should be done under the supervision of an instructor keeping in mind safety at all times.  The intensity of each strike begins at a comfortable level for each partner, gradually increasing the intensity.  During these drills, muscle relaxation and proper breathing are essential.  In the Shinjinbukan School, the use of tenshin changes the entire feel and level of these conditioning drills. 

There are several scientific theories that deal with the benefits of conditioning the bones through loading (using external pressure or force), such as the following:
  — The Law of Transformation of Bones or Wolff's Law developed by Julius Wolff (1836 – 1902).
Published in Germany in 1892, this states the following: "the structure and shape of bone permanently adapt to loading conditions".  Therefore, as the loading (pressure or force) used against a bone increases, it will gradually remodel itself to become stronger.  And as the loading (pressure or force) used on a bone decreases, it will become weaker, because without stimulus, it is less metabolically costly to maintain the bone mass. 
See Julius Wolff Institut for Biomechanics and Musculoskeletal Regeneration

  — The Mechanostat developed by Harold M. Frost (1921 – 2004).
It was published in Utah, USA in 1960.  It is a refinement of Wolff's law and used as a model describing bone growth and bone loss. It states that the bones adapt to mechanical stress.
See Mechanostat by Harold Frost (Wikipedia Article)

See Kote Kitae, Uke Kata , Kote Kitae and Uke Kata Drills (Photos) , Kotei Kitae — Arm Conditioning Drills (Photos)

小林流

こばやしりゅう

Kobayashi Ryū  (alt. Kobayashi Ryuu, Kobayashi Ryu)

Glossary Category:  Okinawa Karate Dō/Ryūha , Shinjinbukan/Syllabus

Lit. The small forest style.  A Shōrin Ryū lineage and the oldest style of Karate founded by Chibana Chōshin Sensei.  Hence, it is referred as Chibana Ha.  It is also known as Kobayashi Ryū, because Chibana Sensei used the characters 小林流, which could be pronounced either Shōrin Ryū or Kobayashi Ryū.  In addition, other schools write Shōrin Ryū with different characters, which helps distinguish different lineages.  The Shinjinbukan School carries the tradition of the Kobayashi Ryū lineage started by Chibana Chōshin Sensei. 
See Chibana Chōshin , Shōrin Ryū (1)

   

古武道

こぶどう

Kobudō  (alt. kobudou, kobudo)

Glossary Category:  Kobudō

Lit. The ancient martial way.  In general, this term could apply to any ancient martial art.  It is commonly used to refer to the Okinawan weapon systems, also known as Kobujutsu.
See Ryūkyū Kobudō , Okinawa Kobudō , Kobujutsu

古武術

こぶじゅつ

Kobujutsu

Glossary Category:  Kobudō

Lit. Ancient combat art.  It is commonly used to refer to the Okinawan weapon systems, also known as Kobudō.  There are two main weapon styles in Okinawa: Ryūkyū Kobudō and Okinawa Kobudō.
See Ryūkyū Kobudō , Okinawa Kobudō , Kobujutsu

講道館

こうどうかん

Kōdōkan  (alt. koudoukan, kodokan)

Glossary Category:  Budō/General Terms

Lit. The Hall dedicated to learn, prove and practice the principle.  The birthplace of Judō founded in 1882 by Master Kanō Jigorō.  Today Kōdōkan is the Judō World Headquarters, located in Tokyo.  At age 22, Kanō Jigorō started Kōdōkan with only nine students and twelve floor mats.  The training hall was located inside the Eishoji Temple.  Over time, different schools of Jujutsu were integrated into Judō.  See Judō , Jūjutsu

後輩

こうはい

kōhai  (alt. kouhai, kohai)

Glossary Category:  Nihongo/Culture , Budō/Ranks & Titles

Lit. Junior rank (social status at work, school or family).  In Asian cultures the use of a rank structure is very important across all aspects of society.  This is quite evident in business settings, classrooms and in traditional arts.  The senpai (senior) and the kōhai (junior) have clear roles and duties.  This is quite evident in traditional Martial Arts schools.  The senpai has a duty of guiding, teaching and leading the kōhai, while the kōhai has the duty of obeying, following and supporting the senpai.  For example, the kōhai students performs most of the cleaning duties or and chores in Dōjō.  In the Shinjinbukan School, the social interaction among kōhai, senpai and Sensei follows the rules of etiquette or reigi sahō. 
See senpai

こころ

kokoro 

Glossary Category:  Budō/Philosophy , Okinawa Karate Dō/Anatomy

Lit. Mind, heart, spirit. 

後屈立ち       后屈立 

こくつだち

kokutsu dachi 

Glossary Category:  Okinawa Karate Dō/Tachikata

Lit. Back Leaning Stance.  It is also known as Back Stance.  Kokutsu dachi is basically the same stance as zenkutsu dachi (front stance), with the body orientated to the opposite side (back).  Both kokutsu dachi and zenkutsu dachi work together as a set by rotating from the body's center axis.  It is commonly used for basic combinations of uke, tsuki and keri drills. 
See zenkutsu dachi , sakutsu dachi , okutsu dachi

   

Search Alphabetically or By Topic            Dictionary Format            Bibliography            Rōmaji — Japanese with roman letters            Back To Top

   

呼吸

こきゅう

kokyū  (alt. kokyuu, kokyu)

Glossary Category:  Budō/General Terms , Shinjinbukan/System

Lit. Breath, respiration.  See Dontohō

呼吸法

こきゅうほう

kokyūhō  (alt. kokyuuhou, kokyuho)

Glossary Category:  Budō/General Terms , Shinjinbukan/System

Lit. Breathing techniques, breath control.  See Dontohō

今晩は

こんばんは

konbanwa  (alt. konnichiha)   

Glossary Category:  Nihongo/Basics

Lit. Good evening.  This is the formal nighttime greeting. 

今日は

こんにちは

konnichiwa  (alt. konnichiha)   

Glossary Category:  Nihongo/Basics

Lit. Good day.  This is the formal daytime greeting. 

こし

koshi (1) 

Glossary Category:  Okinawa Karate Dō/Anatomy , Shinjinbukan/System

Lit. Hip.  There are three generic definitions of Koshi taught at the Shinjinbukan School.  The first definition of Koshi refers to the hip joint: the ball and socket joint at the juncture of the femur (thighbone) and the acetabulum (a cup-shaped socket in the pelvis).  Therefore, the "Koshi/Hip Joint Mechanism" refers to body mechanics used to create a more effective motion of the hip joint area. 
See koshi (2) , koshi (3)

こし

koshi (2) 

Glossary Category:  Shinjinbukan/System

Lit. Hip.  The second definition of Koshi refers to the "Koshi as the Core Mechanism" that integrates all the mid section of the body by generating a unique multi-directional control of the core and its relationship to the body's center of gravity.  For example, these types of koshi are quite evident during several parts of Shinjinbukan training: kakie, chishi, or hip joint warm-up exercises.  The "Koshi/Core Mechanism" taught by Onaga Yoshimitsu Kaichō is a small part of a complete system of body mechanics based on Ti.  These body mechanics are significantly different than those used by other Karate styles and Martial Arts in general. 
See koshi (1) , koshi (3)

こし

koshi (3) 

Glossary Category:  Shinjinbukan/System

Lit. Hip.  The third definition of Koshi refers to the "Koshi as the Tsuki, Keri, Tenshin Mechanism".  This mechanism is based on the motion of the hips, body core, head, shoulders, etc., in order to increase the power and efficiency of every tsuki (hand strike), keri (foot strike) and tenshin (body displacement or movement).  This "Koshi/Tsuki, Keri, Tenshin Mechanism" as taught by Onaga Yoshimitsu Kaichō, is the product of an evolution within Okinawa Ti and it is only a small part of a complete system of body mechanics.  In the Okinawan dialect, these teachniques are often refered as "Gamaku" or "Kushi Jikke"
See koshi (1) , koshi (2)

後退

こうたい

kōtai (1) 

Glossary Category:  Okinawa Karate Dō/Commands , Shinjinbukan/System

Lit. Retreat, Backspace.  This command is used during drills to indicate retreat or move back.  In the Shinjinbukan School, we do no have the concept of moving back and forth.  According to Onaga Kaichō, "Our bodies do not move back and forth, but left or right."  The reasoning behind this approach is that we do not have four legs.  We do not have front or back legs, only left and right legs. 
See tenshin , zenshin

交代

こうたい

kōtai (2) 

Glossary Category:  Okinawa Karate Dō/Commands , Shinjinbukan/System

Lit. Alternate, change, shift.  This command is used change the flank or side of the body which leads the movement or executes the technique.  For example, switching between keri with the left or the right leg.  In the Shinjinbukan School, we use several techniques to switch flanks: mae no ten and ushiro no ten.
See ashi kōtai , ushiro no ten , mae no ten

小手鍛え

こてきたえ

kote kitae

Glossary Category:  Okinawa Karate Dō/Techniques , Shinjinbukan/Syllabus

Lit. Forearm conditioning.  This is a general term used to describe many different types of conditioning drills to develop resistance in the forearms.  Kote Kitae drills are based on striking different uke (blocks) against a training partner or a target such as a wooden stick, a padded target, etc.  In the Shinjinbukan School, the use of tenshin changes the entire feel and level of Kote Kitae. 
See Kitae Gata , Uke Kata , Kote Kitae & Uke Kata Drills (Photos) , Kotei Kitae — Arm Conditioning Drills (Photos)

くま

kuma

Glossary Category:  Shinjinbukan/System

Lit. Bear. 

組手

くみて

kumite

Glossary Category:  Budō/General Terms

Lit. Sparring. 

黒帯

くろおび

kuro obi

Glossary Category:  Budō/Ranks & Titles

Lit. Black Belt.  All ranks from Sho Dan (1st Degree Black Belt) to Ju Dan (10th Degree Black Belt).
See Yūdansha, Mudansha, Dan, Kyū

ク-サンク-

Kūsankū  (alt. Kusanku)

Glossary Category:  Okinawa Karate Dō/Kata , Shinjinbukan/Syllabus

A set of two Katas from the Shuri Ti tradition practiced by all Shōrin Ryū styles and part of the Shinjinbukan curriculum: Kūsankū Dai and Kūsankū Shō.  In Japanese Karate this kata is called Kanku.
See Kūsankū Dai , Kūsankū Shō

   

Search Alphabetically or By Topic            Dictionary Format            Bibliography            Rōmaji — Japanese with roman letters            Back To Top

   

ク-サンク-大

ク-サンク-ダイ

Kūsankū Dai  (alt. Kuusankuu Dai, Kusanku Dai)

Glossary Category:  Okinawa Karate Dō/Kata , Shinjinbukan/Syllabus

Lit. The Large Kūsankū.  The "greater" of the two Kūsankū Katas from the Shuri Ti tradition practiced by all Shōrin Ryū styles and part of the Shinjinbukan curriculum.
See Kūsankū Shō

ク-サンク-小

ク-サンク-ショウ

Kūsankū Shō  (alt. Kuusankuu Shou, Kusanku Sho)

Glossary Category:  Okinawa Karate Dō/Kata , Shinjinbukan/Syllabus

Lit. The small Kūsankū.  The "lesser" of the two Kūsankū Katas from the Shuri Ti tradition practiced by all Shōrin Ryū styles and part of the Shinjinbukan curriculum.
See Kūsankū Dai

教士

きょうし

Kyōshi  (alt. kyoushi, kyoshi)

Glossary Category:  Budō/Ranks & Titles

Lit. A refined, polished samurai teacher.  Nowadays, Japanese traditional martial arts use the titles Renshi, Kyōshi and Hanshi, which are equivalent to senior instructor ranks.  These tittles were first used by the Samurai warrior.  Kyōshi is the second highest of the three instructor ranks.  It is usually held by a Nana Dan (7th Dan) or a Hachi Dan (8th Dan).
See Renshi, Hanshi, Nana Dan, Hachi Dan

きゅう

kyū (1)  (alt. kyuu, kyu)

Glossary Category:  Budō/Ranks & Titles

Lit. Rank.  It refers to all the junior ranks below black belt.  There are 10 kyū ranks, which start from 10th kyū all the way up to 1st kyū.  Each school of martial art has a different convention on which color belt is assigned to a each kyū rank.  However, the concept of having ten junior ranks below black belt is consistent in most martial arts, regardless of the belts’ color. 
See Mudansha, Yūdansha, Dan

   

九段

きゅうだん

Kyū Dan  (alt. kyuudan, kyūdan, kyudan, kyu-dan)

Glossary Category:  Budō/Ranks & Titles

Lit. Ninth level or rank.  It refers to the rank of ninth degree black belt. 
See Hanshi, Jū Dan

九級

きゅうきゅう

Kyū Kyū  (alt. kyuukyuu, kyūkyū, kyukyu, kyu-kyū)

Glossary Category:  Budō/Ranks & Titles

Lit. Ninth level or rank.  It refers to the ninth rank level below black belt.
See Mudansha

究道館

きゅうどうかん

Kyūdōkan  (alt. Kyuudoukan, Kyudokan)

Glossary Category:  Okinawa Karate Dō/Ryūha

Lit. The hall for the research of the way.  A Shōrin Ryū School founded by Higa Yuchoku Dai Sensei.
See Higa Yūchoku

求心

きゅうしん

kyūshin  (alt. kyuushin, kyushin)

Glossary Category:  Shinjinbukan/System

Lit. Centripetal.  An object in circular motion requires a constant force pushing it toward the center of its circular path.  This force is called the centripetal or center seeking force.  The study of Ti deals with body body and body mechanics.  Therefore, it is necessary to develop a scientific understanding of the human body's balance, structure and motion.
See enshin , chūshin , antei

   

Search Alphabetically or By Topic            Dictionary Format            Bibliography            Rōmaji — Japanese with roman letters            Back To Top

    

    

Connect with the Shinjinbukan Network:  Twitter  Facebook  You Tube  Google+

Shinjinbukan.com - The International Portal of the Shinjinbukan Foundation.

Home

OUR TEACHER:

Onaga Yoshimitsu Kaichō

Tichikayā

ONAGA KAICHŌ'S TEACHINGS:

Dōjō Kun

Ti no Tetsugaku

Reigi Sahō

Uchi Deshi

Shinjinbukan no Māku

Shinjinbukan Uta

 

OUR SCHOOL IN OKINAWA:

Shinjinbukan Honbu Dōjō

Onaga Michiko Kanchō

Arakaki Shunichi Sensei

Miyahira Tōru Sensei

Nafuda

GENERAL INFORMATION:

Shinjinbukan no Keitō

Shinjinbukai − Affiliate members

Deshi List

 

OUR SHIBU:

Shibu Directory

Our Shibu's Nafuda

 

OUR SHIBU / NORTH AMERICA:

NEW YORK, NEW YORK − USA:

Shinjinbukan New York Shibu Dōjō

Jimmy Mora − Shibu Chō

 

OUR SHIBU / ASIA:

ISRAEL:

Shinjinbukan Tel Aviv Dōjō

Slava Grinshpun − Dōjō Chō

 

OUR SHIBU / EUROPE:

LATVIA:

Shinjinbukan Riga Dōjō

Artis Pabriks − Shibu Chō

FRANCE:

Shinjinbukan Lyon Dōjō

Jean-marie Perrier − Dōjō Chō

Ludovic Soler − Assistant Instructor

GERMANY:

Shinjinbukan Augsburg Dōjō

Melanie Petrak − Dōjō Chō

Shinjinbukan Bruchsal Dōjō

Christian Streicher − Dōjō Chō

 

LEARNING RESOURCES:

TRAINING MANUALS:

Bookstore

The Shinjinbukan System

RYŪKYŪ MARTIAL ARTS:

History of Okinawa Karate Dō

Budō Jiten − Martial arts dictionary

Uchināguchi − Okinawan language

Frequently asked questions

Links − Recommended websites

NIHONGO − JAPANESE LANGUAGE:

Rōmaji − Hepburn system

Hiragana and Katakana

Kanji − Chinese characters

MULTIMEDIA:

Videos

Gallery

Articles

ABOUT US:

The Shinjinbukan Foundation

The Shinjinbukan Network

Contact us

Credits − Contributors

Copyright − Legal disclosure

Shinjinbukan.com - The International Portal of the Shinjinbukan Foundation.

神人武館ニューヨーク支部道場、アメリカ合衆国 / Shinjinbukan New York Shibu Dōjō — United States
Ripley-Grier Studios, 939 8th Avenue, #307, New York, NY 10019, USA ∙ email: info@shinjinbukan.com ∙ Private Dōjō: To visit please make an appointment.   more

Shibu Chō: Jimmy Mora, Renshi, Roku Dan (6th Dan) ∙ © 2016 Shinjinbukan Foundation

Shinjinbukan.com - The International Portal of the Shinjinbukan Foundation.

Shinjinbukan.com は、神人武館財団により無料で提供されております。このサイトの立場は、私個人では翁長良光会長のご指導について表現するものと理解しております。したがって、会長に代わって何かを主張するものではありません。もうひとつ、弟子の一人として是非付け加えたいですが、会長の人生や口述での伝統について掲載したいと望んでおります。ジミー・モラ

Shinjinbukan.com is a free resource sponsored by the Shinjinbukan Foundation. The statements on this site represent my own personal understanding of Onaga Yoshimitsu Kaichō's teachings. Therefore, I do not claim to speak on his behalf. As one more of his students, I am eager to share his living and oral traditions. Jimmy Mora

Shinjinbukan.com is a free resource sponsored by the Shinjinbukan Foundation to share Onaga Yoshimitsu Kaichō's Ti: a living and oral tradition.