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武道辞典

Budō Jiten − Martial Arts Dictionary

This dictionary is the result of my personal research to develop a martial arts vocabulary based on the living traditions of Ti, as taught by my teacher Onaga Yoshimitsu Kaichō at the Shinjinbukan School. Unauthorized reproduction, translation into other languages or sale of these materials constitutes a copyright violation.

Written by Jimmy Mora

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巻藁

マチワラ

Machiwara 

Glossary Category:  Shinjinbukan/Syllabus

Lit. Striking or punching board.  Machiwara is part of the Ryūkyū Martial Arts tradition known as Okinawa Ti.  Machiwara training requires a high level of skill, coordination, muscle control and breathing techniques.  This type of training should only be carried under the direct supervision of a qualified instructor.  Any misuse of the Machiwara can cause serious injuries. 

There aree three types of Machiwara used and taught at the Shinjinbukan School:
  — Tachi Machiwara (Standing Machiwara),
  — Ti Machiwara (Handheld Machiwara)
  — Sagi Machiwara (Hanging Machiwara) 

In general, the term Machiwara normally refers to the Tachi Machiwara. 

Machiwara training is widely misunderstood as a method of hardening the knuckles.  However, this notion is wrong.  Another misconception is the use of a "wall makiwara", a solid punching target placed flat agains the surface of a wall.  In the Shinjinbukan School, this is considered a complete misunderstanding of the principles of Ti .
See Makiwara , Tachi Machiwara , Ti Machiwara , Sagi Machiwara

まえ

mae

Glossary by Category:  Okinawa Karate Dō/Commands

Lit. Front. 

前に

まえに

mae ni

Glossary by Category:  Okinawa Karate Dō/Commands

Lit. Ahead, before, ago.  It is used as a command during drills to indicate: "move to the front". 

前に見て

まえにみて

mae ni mite

Glossary by Category:  Okinawa Karate Dō/Commands

It is used as a command during drills to indicate: "look to the front". 

前の点

まえのてん

mae no ten

Glossary Category:  Shinjinbukan/System

Lit. Front point.  Mae no Ten is the front point of a triangle which is marked by the positions of the feet.  The body moves through Mae no Ten or front point as it changes sides or flanks.  The center axis of the body is maintained at all times, and the motion is generated from the hip rotation rather than from the feet marking the triangle.  The study of Mae no Ten is an essential step towards understanding Tenshin.  For example, in a Jigotai Stance, in order to change flanks (left and right flank), the feet could pass through Mae no Ten.

See  ushiro no ten , mae no ten (photos)

前蹴り

まえげり

mae geri

Glossary Category:  Okinawa Karate Dō/Techniques

Lit. Foot strike to the front.  In sports Karate it is called "front kick". 

孫弟子

まごでし

Mago Deshi

Glossary Category:  Budō/Ranks & Titles , Shinjinbukan/Philosophy

Lit. A disciple of a disciple.  In traditional Martial Arts, it is typical for masters to teach their deshi (disciples), as well as the deshi of their deshi, who are known as mago deshi.  In the Shinjinbukan School, this approach has been used to ensure the preservation of the traditions and knowledge of Onaga no Ti.  Therefore, mago deshi will often be taught with the same depth and intensity as Onaga Kaichō's own deshi.   
See Sensei, seito, Uchi Deshi , Deshi , Onaga no Ti

巻藁       巻き藁

マキワラ

Makiwara 

Glossary Category:  Shinjinbukan/Syllabus

Lit. Striking or punching board.   
See Machiwara

真直

ますぐ

masugu 

Glossary Category:  Shinjinbukan/System

Lit. Straight line, direct, upright, erect, honest, frank.  It describes a movement in a straight line, or a body alignment.

松林流

まつばやしりゅう

Matsubayashi Ryū  (alt. Matsubayashi Ryuu, Matsubayashi Ryu)

Glossary Category:  Okinawa Karate Dō/Ryūha

Lit. The Pine forest style.  The style of karate founded in Okinawa by Master Nagamine Shōshin.  The same Chinese characters could be pronounced either Shōrin Ryū or Matsubayashi Ryū.  Therefore, Nagamine’s style is also known as Shōrin Ryū Matsubayashi or Matsubayashi Ryū. 
See Nagamine Shōshin , Shōrin Ryū (2)

   

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回し

まわし

mawashi (1)

Glossary Category:  Budō/General Terms

Lit. Sumo loincloth. 

廻し

まわし

mawashi (2)

Glossary Category:  Budō/General Terms , Okinawa Karate Dō/Techniques

Lit. Round, game, revolve, go around or circumference. 

前回踢       廻蹴

まわしげり

mawashi geri

Glossary Category:  Okinawa Karate Dō/Techniques

Lit. Round kick.  Used more for sports sparring.

廻って

まわって

mawatte

Glossary by Category:  Okinawa Karate Dō/Commands

Lit. Turn around. 

me

Glossary Category:  Okinawa Karate Dō/Anatomy

Lit. Eyes. 

目、足、手

め、あし、て

me, ashi, te

Glossary Category:  Shinjinbukan/System

Lit. Eyes, feet & hand.  In the Shinjinbukan School, the sequence "me, ashi, te" is taught as a method of coordinating the eyes, feet and hands.  In practical terms, the real meaning of this concept is "me (eyes), ashi (feet rotation into a preparatory position) and te (hand motion + tenshin or body displacement)"
See me , ashi , te , me, ashi, tenshin

目、足、転身

め、あし、てんしん

me, ashi, tenshin

Glossary Category:  Shinjinbukan/System

Lit. Eyes, feet & motion.  Based on the concept of "me, ashi, te", a similar formula is used to work on feet patterns on the floor without using the hands.  Therefore, we could speak of "me, ashi, tenshin" as a method of coordinating the eyes, feet and tenshin (body motion).  This concept could be particularly useful to work on Kihon Gata or sections of Kata that repeat a feet pattern over and over.  The next obvious stage will be to add the hands using the concept "me, ashi, te".
See me , ashi , tenshin , me, ashi, te

明武館

めいぶかん 

Meibukan

Glossary Category:  Okinawa Karate Dō/Ryūha

The Gōjū Ryū School founded by Yagi Meitoku Dai Sensei.

みち

michi

Glossary Category:  Budō/Philosophy

See

みぎ 

migi

Glossary by Category:  Okinawa Karate Dō/Commands

Lit. Right Hand side. 

みみ

mimi

Glossary Category:  Okinawa Karate Dō/Anatomy

Lit. Ear. 

   

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宮城長順

ミヤギチョウジュン

Miyagi Chōjun  (alt. Miyagi Choujun, Miyagi Chojun)

Glossary Category:  Okinawa Karate Dō/Masters

Miyagi Chōjun Dai Sensei (1888 — 1953) was the founder of Gōjū Ryū Karate in Okinawa.  He was a student of Kanryo Higaonna (1853 — 1915), under the Naha Ti Tradition.
See Gōjū Ryū

宮城長順先生の予備運動

みやぎちょうじゅんせんせいのよびうんどう

Miyagi Chōjun Sensei No Yobiundō  (alt. Miyagi Choujun no Yobiundou, Miyagi Chojun no Yobiundo)

Glossary Category:  Shinjinbukan/Syllabus

Miyagi Chojun Sensei’s conditioning exercises.  A set of body conditioning exercises created by Master Miyagi Chōjun, the founder of Gōjū Ryū.  This collection of excersise is commonly known as Yobiundō.  Many traditional Schools used to practice Miyagi Sensei's Yobiundō, but it is less known today. In the early days of Karate, beginner students in Okinawa were required to practice Yobiundō exclusively for hours at a time during the first few years of training.

Master Onaga Yoshimits, the founder of the Shinjinbukan School, refined and further developed the original Yobiundō created by Miyagi Chōjun Sensei. In the Shinjinbukan School, Yobiundō is part of the required training, provide the correct body conditioning and body mechanics used to train Ti.
See yobiundō, Shinjinbukan no Yobiundō

宮本武蔵

みやもと  むさし

Miyamoto Musashi 

Glossary Category:  Budō/Masters

Miyamoto Musashi (1584 — 1645) was one of Japan's most legendary Samurai and the founder of the Ni Ten Ichi Ryū school of sword fighting.  He is also well known for the Gorin no Sho (The Book of Five Rings).  Even though there is no historical evidence that Musashi was the author the Book of Five Rings, it is commonly attributed to him.  Numerous books and movies have been inspired on his life.  According to several sources, Musashi was undefeated in combat during his lifetime.  However, based both on historical accounts and oral traditions, it is hard to separate facts from fiction regarding his life.

Miyamoto Musashi's philosophy has inspired Martial Artists for centuries.  The Shinjinbukan School follows many principles described in the Gorin no Sho, such as the need to practice all techniques 50 or 100 time, or even 1,000 times.  Only after 10,000 accurate repetitions can we appreciate and truly understand one single technique. 
See Gorin No Sho

持ち方

もちかた

mochikata

Glossary Category:  Shinjinbukan/System

Lit. How to hold an object such as tools, calligraphy brush, Ohashi (chopsticks), etc.  In the Shinjinbukan School, the understanding of mochikata is essential for training with any of the special tools used in traditional Okinawan martial arts.  Normally it refers to the way of holding the chīshi, or other tools like to hammers, sāshi, nigiri game (heavy ceramic jars); or even the bō (staff) or other Kobudō weapons.  In the tradition of Okinawa Ti, the term mochikata really means: the ability to hold, lift and control an object of any size, weight or shape by using the most efficient body mechanics.  The understanding of mochikata is deeply connected to the use of shiboru. 
See shiboru , chīshi , sāshi

mu

Glossary Category:  Budō/Philosophy

Lit. Emptiness.  This term is used in Zen Buddhism to describe a state of emptiness or nothingness common throughout Japanese arts and culture. 
See mushin, mushin no shin , satori , zen , zazen

ムチミ

muchimi

Glossary Category:  Shinjinbukan/System

Lit. Sticky movement.  Muchimi is a unique quality of authentic Okinawan Karate by which a heavy sticky feeling is incorporated into any body movement.  A classic example is found within the motion of the feet and legs in all three Naifuanchi Katas.  Another example is the movement of the arms during Kakie, Iri Kumi and Findi, which use muchimi (stickiness) against the point of contact with the oponent's body. 

Muchimi could not be achieved with pure muscle force, or with any stiffness, or with muscle tension.  On the contrary, muscle relaxation must be maintained at all times.  It is almost impossible to learn muchimi without feeling the "muchimi touch" of a qualified intructor.  Therefore, it is essential to feel and apply muchimi to any given technique in order to begin to understand the body mechanics of Ti.

無段者

むだんしゃ

Mudansha 

Glossary Category:  Budō/Ranks & Titles

Lit. A person without a grade or dan.  In martial arts, it refers to a person holding a junior rank below black belt.  These ranks are called kyū, and collectively they are referred as mudansha.  All traditional Japanese martial arts use ten junior ranks. 
See Kyū, Yūdansha, Dan

むね

mune

Glossary Category:  Okinawa Karate Dō/Anatomy

Lit. Chest, bosom, breast, heart, feelings. 

結び立ち

むすびだち

musubi dachi

Glossary Category:  Okinawa Karate Dō/Tachikata

Lit. Open feet stance.  Feet at 90 degrees while heels are together.

無心

むしん

mushin

Glossary Category:  Budō/Philosophy

Lit. No thought or emotion, innocent.  This term is used in Zen Buddhism to describe a state of mind with no emotions, or no thoughts.  This was an integral part of the Samurai way of life, which influenced the development of Japanese Martial Arts. 
See mu, mushin no shin, satori, zen, zazen

無心の心

むしんのしん

mushin no shin

Glossary Category:  Budō/Philosophy

Lit. Empty heart.  This is a state-of-mind by which a warrior's heart should be void of anger, fear, pride and any other thoughts in the midst of danger.  The concept of mushin no shin is closely related to Zen Buddhism.  It was essential for the mental and spiritual training of the Japanese Samurai.  Nowadays, martial artists still need such emptines of heart and peace of mind in order to focus during training and to be able to repeat each technique thousands of times. 
See mu, mushin, satori, zen, zazen

   

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Shinjinbukan.com は、神人武館財団により無料で提供されております。このサイトの立場は、私個人では翁長良光会長のご指導について表現するものと理解しております。したがって、会長に代わって何かを主張するものではありません。もうひとつ、弟子の一人として是非付け加えたいですが、会長の人生や口述での伝統について掲載したいと望んでおります。ジミー・モラ

Shinjinbukan.com is a free resource sponsored by the Shinjinbukan Foundation. The statements on this site represent my own personal understanding of Onaga Yoshimitsu Kaichō's teachings. Therefore, I do not claim to speak on his behalf. As one more of his students, I am eager to share his living and oral traditions. Jimmy Mora

Shinjinbukan.com is a free resource sponsored by the Shinjinbukan Foundation to share Onaga Yoshimitsu Kaichō's Ti: a living and oral tradition.