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武道辞典

Budō Jiten − Martial Arts Dictionary

This dictionary is the result of my personal research to develop a martial arts vocabulary based on the living traditions of Ti, as taught by my teacher Onaga Yoshimitsu Kaichō at the Shinjinbukan School. Unauthorized reproduction, translation into other languages or sale of these materials constitutes a copyright violation.

Written by Jimmy Mora

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れい

rei

Glossary by Category:  Okinawa Karate Dō/Commands

Lit. Expression of gratitude.  In Asian culture bowing is an expression of gratitude or reverence.  In martial arts rei is an important expression of the warrior culture and ettiquette.  The command rei is used during drills to cue the bowing among students and seniors.
See reigi, reigi sahō

礼儀

れいぎ

reigi

Glossary Category:  Budō/General Terms

Lit. Manners, courtesy, etiquette.  All traditional martial art schools have rules of etiquette.  These rules of behavior are observed at all times, especially during training, social occasions and ceremonies.  For example, there are different types of bowing between seniors and juniors; or during seiza (sitting meditation) at the beginning and end of every class.
See rei, reigi sahō

礼儀作法

れいぎさほう

reigi sahō  (alt. reigi sahou, reigi saho)

Glossary by Category:  Shinjinbukan/Philosophy

Lit. A set of etiquette, courtesy, manners & propriety.  In addition to the general martial arts etiquette, the Shinjinbukan School carries an ancient tradition of Okinawan martial arts and culture.  This set of traditions, manners and ettiquette as a whole is referred to as reigi sahō.  Reigi sahō is evident during training and social occasions.
See rei, reigi

歴史

れきし

rekishi

Glossary Category:  Nihongo/Culture

Lit. History.

錬士

れんし

Renshi

Glossary Category:  Budō/Ranks & Titles

Lit. A refined, polished samurai expert.  Nowadays, Japanese traditional martial arts use the titles Renshi, Kyōshi and Hanshi, which are equivalent to senior instructor ranks.  These titles were first used by the Samurai warriors.  Renshi is the first of the three instructor ranks.  It is usually held by a Roku Dan (6th Dan).
See Roku Dan, Go Dan, Kyōshi, Hanshi

練習

れんしゅう

renshū  (alt. renshuu, renshu)

Glossary Category:  Nihongo/Culture , Budō/General Terms

Lit. Practice.  This word is constantly used by Japanese people to inspire intense practice, training or studying among students of any discipline.

六段

ろくだん

Roku Dan  (alt. rokudan, roku-dan)

Glossary Category:  Budō/Ranks & Titles

Lit. Sixth level or rank.  It refers to the rank of sixth degree black belt.
See Renshi, Go Dan

六級

ろきゅう

Ro Kyū  (alt. rokyuu, rokyū, rokyu, ro-kyū)

Glossary Category:  Budō/Ranks & Titles

Lit. Sixth level or rank.  It refers to the sixth rank level below black belt.
See Mudansha

りゅう

ryū (1)  (alt. ryuu, ryu)

Glossary Category:  Budō/General Terms

Lit. Dragon. 

りゅう

ryū (2)  (alt. ryuu, ryu)

Glossary Category:  Budō/General Terms , Okinawa Karate Dō/Ryūha

Lit. Style of, method of, manner of, current, a sink, or flow.  This Chinese character is part of most of the names in modern Karate styles, regardless of being Okinawan or Japanese.  For example: Shōrin Ryū, Gōjū Ryū, Uechi Ryū, Isshin Ryū, Wadō Ryū, Shito Ryū, etc.

   

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流派

りゅうは

ryūha  (alt. ryuuha, ryuha)

Glossary Category:  Nihongo/Culture , Budō/General Terms , Okinawa Karate Dō/Ryūha

Lit. A school or style.  The name of a style or an original school of thinking and practice.  This term is used in all traditional Japanese arts, including martials arts and Karate styles.

琉球

りゅうきゅう

Ryūkyū  (alt. Ryuukyuu, Ryukyu)

Glossary Category:  Uchinā/Culture

Lit. Lapis lazuli ball or sphere.  It refers to the Ryūkyū Islands or the Ryūkyū Kingdom, known in Chinese as the Liuqiu.  Its earliest mention in historical records dates back to the Sui Dynasty (580 — 618).  In 607, Zhu Kuan, a Chinese explorer sent by Emperor Yangdi, discovered some islands in the East China Sea.  He described them as “floating globes” and called them Liuqiu, but their exact location was unknown. 

Later, the Okinawa Island and its surrounding archipelago came to be known as the "Great Liuqiu" and Taiwan as the "Liuqiu Minor".  The Great Liuqiu maintained informal trade and cultural relations with China during the Tang Dynasty (618 — 906), the Song Dynasty (960 — 1279) and the Yuan Dynasty (1279 — 1368). 

In 1372, during the Ming Dynasty (1368 — 1644ad) an imperial envoy arrived to the Ryūkyū Islands to request tribute and institute the Chinese calendar.  At the time the Ryūkyūs were divided in three kingdoms: Hokuzan, Chuzan, and Nanzan.  Lord Satto of Chuzan was the first to accept.  In return, he received a seal, or cefeng, investing him as king and was visited by the Tianshi, or "celestial envoy", with a delegation of several hundred members.  By 1383, a Chinese settlement was established at Kume Village, Naha.  China recognized each of the Ryūkyū kings with a cefeng.  However, by 1416, the Chuzan unified the Ryūkyūs under King Hashi.  Every Tianshi mission that visited Okinawa remained in Shuri for weeks or months at a time.  Through history, the Ryūkyū Kings received 16 cefeng missions during the Ming Dynasty, and 8 cefeng missions during the Qing Dynasty (1644 — 1911). 

Okinawa became an important trading point between Japan, China, Korea and Southeast Asia.  During the 15th and 16th century over 150 trading expeditions were sent from the Ryūkyū Kingdom to Southeast Asia, to include Siam (modern-day Thailand), Malacca (the 2nd smallest state in Malaysia), Pattani (modern-day Thai provinces of Pattani, Yala and Narathiwat); and Java (Indonesia’s largest island).  The Chinese tributary system was accepted by many Asian states to ensure regional peace.  By offering tribute each nation received the benefit of peace without having to surrender their autonomy.  In 1879, as China’s sphere of influence diminished, the Ryūkyū Kingdom became part of Japan's territory under the official name of Okinawa Ken (Okinawa Prefecture).
See Okinawa

琉球武士

りゅうきゅうぶし

Ryūkyū Bushi

Glossary Category:  Shinjinbukan/System , Shinjinbukan/Philosophy

Lit. Ryūkyū warrior.  A person who has mastered the technical depth and the spirit/heart of Ryūkyū no Tii.  In other words, a Tichikayā (Ti practitioner) of the highest caliber.  In the Shinjinbukan School, one of the most important goals is to aim for the qualities of the Ryūkyū Bushi
See Ti , Ryūkyū no Ti , Onaga no Ti , Tichikayā

琉球古武道

りゅうきゅうこぶどう

Ryūkyū Kobudō  (alt. Ryuukyuu Kobudou, Ryukyu Kobudo)   

Glossary Category:  Kobudō

The Okinawan weapons system founded by Taira Shinken (1897 — 1970) and later continued by his disciple Akamine Eisuke (1925 — 1999).
See Ti , Kobujutsu

琉球の手

りゅうきゅうのてぃー

Ryūkyū no Ti

Glossary Category:  Shinjinbukan/System , Shinjinbukan/Philosophy

The indigenous martial art developed in the Ryūkyū.  The term Ryūkyū no Ti describes the martial arts culture associated with the practice of Ti.  The more common term, Okinawa Ti, is used in most Karate books; it only focuses on the geographic location.  Indeed, Ti (and by default Karate) originated in Okinawa, but the Ryūkyū culture of Ti (the essence of Karate in Okinawa) has almost disappeared and been replaced by sports Karate. 

In contrast, the Shinjinbukan School was founded to preserve and continue developing Ryūkyū no Ti.  The importance of this term is reflected by the official song of the Shinjinbukan School. 
See Ryūkyū , Ti , Onaga no Ti , The Shinjinbukan Song , Tichikayā

琉球の手の礼儀作法

りゅうきゅうのてぃーのれいぎさほう

Ryūkyū no Ti no Reigi Sahō  (alt. Ryuukyuu no Ti reigi sahou, Ryukyu no Ti no reigi saho)

Glossary Category:  Shinjinbukan/Philosophy

The Etiquette of Ryūkyū Ti.  The set of ettiquete, cutoms and traditions practiced by the Tichikayā (Ti practitioner).  There are a lot of philosophical and martial arts concepts associated with each specific ritual or custom.  The Shinjinbukan curriculum is centered around the pursuit of Ti and all aspects of Ryūkyū no Ti no Reigi Sahō
See Ryūkyū , Ti , Onaga no Ti , The Shinjinbukan Song , Tichikayā

   

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Shinjinbukan.com は、神人武館財団により無料で提供されております。このサイトの立場は、私個人では翁長良光会長のご指導について表現するものと理解しております。したがって、会長に代わって何かを主張するものではありません。もうひとつ、弟子の一人として是非付け加えたいですが、会長の人生や口述での伝統について掲載したいと望んでおります。ジミー・モラ

Shinjinbukan.com is a free resource sponsored by the Shinjinbukan Foundation. The statements on this site represent my own personal understanding of Onaga Yoshimitsu Kaichō's teachings. Therefore, I do not claim to speak on his behalf. As one more of his students, I am eager to share his living and oral traditions. Jimmy Mora

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